UT Board of Trustees Kicks Off Discussion on Multi-Year Initiative

Benchmarking, economic forecasts and hypothetical strategies to overcome declining state appropriations and make the University of Tennessee more effective, efficient and entrepreneurial was the subject of the UT Board of Trustees’ Wednesday workshop.

UT President Joe DiPietro had set the stage for Wednesday’s discussion about funding at the trustees’ annual meeting in June. The board’s workshop covered the issue more in depth and allowed trustees to ask questions. The purpose of the discussion was not to devise strategy but gain a better understanding of the issue in order to plan a multi-year initiative.

Projections are that the University could face a gap in state funding of more than $150 million over the next decade–assuming the University could limit tuition increases to 3 percent annually, inflation did not exceed 3 percent annually, and state funding did not increase. To cover such a gap, tuition would need to be compounded to 55 percent or 4.5 percent each year.

DiPietro has said that continuing to increase tuition to cover declining state appropriations is a business model that is struggling, and it is not sustainable to continue to pass along additional costs to students and their families. The University has three options: take no action, get smaller or start on a bold initiative to fix the problem, he said.

“We own this problem. We have to fix it,” DiPietro told trustees. “Change is normally painful for everybody. We will seek broad input. We will make tough decisions.”

Dr. Bill Fox, director of the Center for Business and Economic Research at UT Knoxville, provided the trustees a forecast of state revenues, and each chancellor presented initial thoughts on ways to streamline operations and increase revenues.

The trustees looked at data comparisons with other university systems and heard the president talk about ways other university systems and universities have addressed similar funding issues. UT has been using cost-saving measures since the 2008-09 recession and identifying lean processes. Ideas pitched included increasing enrollment of out-of-state students to raise revenue, reviewing academic portfolios, and analyzing better uses of campuses’ space.

“The current funding model of the University of Tennessee is perilously close to broken. Given the fiscal constraints on the state budget, which includes a structural budget deficit, it is unlikely that significant increases in state appropriation to the University of Tennessee will be forthcoming unless the sense of priority for funding higher education becomes widespread and improves. Thus, it is incumbent upon the University to be become more entrepreneurial, efficient and effective, by enhancing existing revenue streams, reducing expenditures, and reallocating existing resources to better achieve system/campus goals and objectives,” according to a UT benchmarking analysis submitted to the trustees.

The board next meets Oct. 2-3, when the discussion will continue. A more set strategy is expected to be revealed at the winter meeting Feb. 25-26 in Memphis.

2014 Primary Election Results

With over a half million votes cast in the early voting period alone, this election marked the highest voter turnout in an August election in Tennessee’s history.  It was also perhaps the longest ballot in the State’s history, containing a retention vote on judges across the state, state and federal primaries, and county general elections. As a result of the lengthy ballot, election results did not come in until late Thursday night.

With regard to Congressional races, Senator Lamar Alexander beat his challenger, State Representative Joe Carr.  All of Tennessee’s members of the House won their primary reelection bids.

With regard to State results, Governor Bill Haslam overwhelmingly won the Republican Primary for Governor. All three Tennessee Supreme Court Justices up for “Replace/Retain” elections were retained.

With regard to the Tennessee General Assembly, eight incumbents lost their seats as a result of the Primary.  In the Senate, this includes Senator Stacey Campfield (R-Knoxville) who was ousted by County Commissioner and surgeon Dr. Richard Briggs, Senator Jim Summerville (R-Dickson) who lost to former Senator Kerry Roberts in a three-way Republican Primary, and Senator Ophelia Ford (D-Memphis), who was beat by Lee Harris, an Associate Professor of Law at the University of Memphis.

In addition, Senator Jim Kyle (D-Memphis) was elected to Shelby County Chancery Court, paving the way for a special election in Tennessee’s 30th Senate District.

In the House, Representative Tony Shipley (R-Kingsport) lost his reelection bid to Bud Hulsey, a retired City of Kingsport policeman, along with longtime incumbent Representative Dennis “Coach” Roach (R-Rutledge) who lost to Jerry Sexton. Also losing bids for reelection were Representative Steve Hall (R-Knoxville), who was defeated by Martin Daniel.  Longtime Representative Gary Odom (D-Nashville) was unseated by attorney John Ray Clemmons, and Representative Vance Dennis (R-Savannah) was ousted by David “Coach” Byrd.

A breakdown of unofficial primary election results is provided below for Tennessee Senate and House races. For more on unofficial primary election results, please visit the Secretary of State’s website.

State Senate Races (Unofficial Results)

District

Results

1

Senator Steve Southerland was uncontested and has no General opponent.

3

Senator Rusty Crowe was uncontested and has no General opponent.

5

Senator Randy McNally was uncontested and has no General opponent.

7

Commissioner Richard Briggs beat incumbent Senator Stacey Campfield with 67 percent of the vote.  He will face democrat Cheri Siler in the General.

9

Senator Mike Bell was uncontested and has no General opponent.

11

Senator Bo Watson was uncontested and has no General opponent.

13

Senator Bill Ketron was uncontested and has no General opponent.

15

In the race for retiring Senator Charlotte Burks’ seat, Representative Paul Bailey defeated his Republican challengers and will face Betty Vaudt in the General Election.

17

Senator Mae Beavers defeated her Republican challenger and has no General opponent.

19

Senator Thelma Harper defeated her Democratic challenger and will face Sterlina Inez Brady in the General Election.

21

In the race for retiring Senator Doug Henry’s seat, Jeff Yarbro defeated his Democratic challenger Mary Mancini.  Yarbro will face Republican Diana Cuellar in the General Election.

23

Senator Jack Johnson was uncontested and has no General opponent.

25

Former State Senator Kerry Roberts beat incumbent Senator Jim Summerville.  Roberts will face Democrat Tony Gross in the General.

27

In the race for retiring Senator Lowe Finney’s seat, Ed Jackson won the Republican Primary and will face Democrat Randy Lamb in the General.

29

Senator Ophelia Ford lost to democratic challenger Lee Harris.  Harris will face Republican Jim Finney in the General.

31

Senator Brian Kelsey was unopposed and has no General opponent.

33

Senator Reginald Tate was unopposed and has no General opponent.

State House Races (Unofficial Results)

District

Results

1

Representative Jon Lundberg was uncontested and has no General opponent.

2

Representative Tony Shipley lost to retired City of Kingsport Policeman Bud Hulsey, who won by 1,655 votes.  Hulsey has no General opponent.

3

Representative Timothy Hill won his race and has no General opponent.

4

Formerly the seat held by Representative Kent Williams, John B. Holsclaw, Jr. won the Republican Primary and will face Rob Martin in the General.

5

Representative David Hawk defeated Republican challenger Ted Hensley and faces an Independent challenger, Kermit Steck, in the General.

6

Representative Micah Van Huss defeated his Republican challenger Clayton Stout.  He has no Democratic challenger in the General.

7

Representative Matthew Hill won a three-way Republican Primary by roughly 700 votes.  He has no General opponent.

8

Representative Art Swann was uncontested and has no General opponent.

9

Representative Mike Harrison was uncontested and has no General opponent.

10

Representative Tilman Goins was uncontested and has no General opponent.

11

Representative Jeremy Faison had no Republican challenger but will face Democrat Marjorie Ramsey and one Independent candidate, Roland Dykes, in the General.

12

Representative Dale Carr was uncontested and has no General opponent.

13

Representative Gloria Johnson was uncontested in the Democratic Primary but will face Republican Eddie Smith in the General, who defeated challenger Jason Emert in the Republican Primary by 34 votes.

14

Representative Ryan Haynes was uncontested and has no General opponent.

15

Representative Joe Armstrong was unopposed and will face Independent candidate Pete Drew in the General.

16

Representative Bill Dunn was uncontested and has no General opponent.

17

Representative Andrew Farmer was uncontested and has no General opponent.

18

Representative Steve Hall was defeated by Martin Daniel and has no General opponent. Hall lost by 165 votes, per unofficial returns.

19

Representative Harry Brooks was uncontested and has no General opponent.

20

Representative Bob Ramsey was uncontested and faces Democrat John Ross Conley in the General.

21

Representative Jimmy Matlock was unopposed and will face Democrat Pamela Weston in the General.

22

Formerly represented by Representative Eric Watson, Dan Howell will now represent District 22.  He defeated Republican challenger J. Adam Lowe and has no General opponent.

23

Representative John Forgety was uncontested and has no General opponent.

24

Representative Kevin Brooks was uncontested and has no General opponent.

25

Representative Cameron Sexton was unopposed in the Republican Primary.  He faces Democrat Judy Barnett in the General.

26

Representative Gerald McCormick was uncontested and has no General opponent.

27

In the race to replace retiring Representative Richard Floyd, Patsy Hazelwood defeated two Republican challengers and will face Democrat Eric McRoy in the General.

28

Representative JoAnne Favors was uncontested and has no General opponent.

29

Representative Mike Carter was uncontested and has no General opponent.

30

Marc Gravitt was uncontested and has no General opponent.  Gravitt will replace retiring Representative Vince Dean.

31

Incumbent Representative Ron Travis beat former Republican Jim Cobb and has no General opponent.

32

Representative Kent Calfee was uncontested in the Republican Primary and will face Democrat Joe Kneiser in the General.

33

Representative John Ragan beat Caitlin Nolan and will face Democrat Misty Neergaard in the General.

34

Representative Rick Womick was uncontested and has no General opponent.

35

Incumbent Representative Dennis “Coach” Roach lost to Republican Jerry Sexton.

36

Representative Dennis Powers was unopposed in the Republican Primary.  He faces Democrat James Virgil Kidwell in the General Election.

37

Representative Dawn White defeated her challenger and faces no opponent in the General.

38

Representative Kelly Keisling was unopposed and has no General opponent.

39

Representative David Alexander defeated his opponent and will face Democrat Matthew Huffer in the General.

40

Representative Terri Lynn Weaver was unopposed and will face Democrat Sarah Marie Smith in the General.

41

Representative John Mark Windle was uncontested and has no General opponent.

42

Representative Ryan Williams was unopposed in the Primary.  He will face Democrat Michael Walsh in the General.

43

Robert Dunham was uncontested in the Republican Primary and will face Kevin Dunlap, the winner of a three-way Democratic Primary, in the General for the seat formerly held by Representative Charles Curtiss.

44

Representative William Lamberth was uncontested and has no General opponent.

45

Representative Courtney Rogers beat opponent Len Silverman and will face Democrat Steven Puckett, Jr. in the General.

46

Representative Mark Pody was uncontested and will face Democrat Candace Reed in the General.

47

Representative Judd Matheny was uncontested and has no General opponent.

48

In a three-way primary race, Republican Bryan Terry emerged as the winner and will face Democrat William Campbell in the General.  Representative Joe Carr currently represents District 48.

49

Representative Mike Sparks won his race and will face Democrat Mike Williams in the General.

50

Representative Bo Mitchell was unopposed in the Democratic Primary and will face Republican Troy Brewer in the General.

51

In a crowded field to replace retiring House Democratic Caucus Chair Representative Mike Turner, Bill Beck won the three-way Democratic Primary and will face Republican Brian Mason in the General.

52

Representative Mike Stewart was uncontested and has no General opponent.

53

Representative Jason Powell will face Republican John Wang in the General.

54

Representative Brenda Gilmore was uncontested and has no General opponent.

55

Nashville attorney John Ray Clemmons unseated democratic Representative Gary Odom.  Clemmons is a former Political Director for the Tennessee Democratic Party and has no General opponent.

56

Speaker Beth Harwell was uncontested and has no General opponent.

57

Representative Susan Lynn was uncontested and will face Democrat Jesse McLevain in the General.

58

Representative Harold Love was uncontested and has no General opponent.

59

Representative Sherry Jones was uncontested and has no General opponent.

60

Democratic Representative Darren Jernigan was uncontested and will face former Republican Representative Jim Gotto in the General.

61

Representative Charles Sargent, who chairs the House Finance, Ways, and Means Committee, defeated challenger Steve Gawrys.  Sargent does not have an opponent in the General.

62

Representative Pat Marsh was uncontested and has no General opponent.

63

Republican Representative Glen Casada defeated challenger Cherie Hammond and faces no General opponent.

64

Representative Sheila Butt was unopposed.  She faces an Independent candidate, James Gray, in the General.

65

Representative Jeremy Durham was uncontested and will face Democrat Bill Peach in the General.

66

For the seat being vacated by Representative Joshua Evans, Sabi (Doc) Kumar won a four-way Republican Primary and will face Democrat Kyle Roberts in the General.

67

Democratic Representative Joe Pitts was unopposed and faces challenger Mike Warner of the Constitution Party in the General.

68

Representative Curtis Johnson was uncontested and has no General opponent.

69

Democratic Representative David Shepard was unopposed and will face Republican Michael Curcio in the General.

70

Republican Representative Barry Doss was uncontested and has no General opponent.

71

Republican Representative Vance Dennis lost his seat to challenger David “Coach” Byrd.

72

Representative Steve McDaniel was uncontested and has no General opponent.

73

Representative Jimmy Eldridge will face Democrat Sheila Godwin in the General.

74

Democratic Representative John Tidwell will face Republican Jay Reedy in the General.

75

Representative Tim Wirgau was unopposed and will face Democrat Randy Patton in the General, as well as Independent candidate James Hart.

76

Representative Andy Holt was unopposed and will face Democrat Joyce Washington in the General.

77

Representative Bill Sanderson was unopposed and has no General opponent.

78

Representative Mary Littleton was unopposed and will face Democrat Jane Crisp in the General.

79

Representative Curtis Halford was unopposed.  He will face Democrat Bobby Barnett in the General.

80

Representative Johnny Shaw was unopposed and has no General opponent.

81

Representative Debra Moody defeated her Republican challenger and has no General opponent.

82

House Minority Leader Representative Craig Fitzhugh was unopposed and has no General opponent.

83

Representative Mark White was unopposed and has no General opponent.

84

Representative Joe Towns easily defeated his challenger and does not have an opponent for the General.

85

Representative Johnnie Turner was unopposed and does not have a General opponent.

86

Representative Barbara Cooper was unopposed and will face Republican George Edwards in the General.

87

Representative Karen Camper was uncontested and has no General opponent.

88

Representative Larry Miller was unopposed and will face Republican Harry Barber in the General.

89

Representative Roger Kane was unopposed and has no General opponent.

90

Representative John DeBerry, Jr. was unopposed and has no General opponent.

91

Representative Raumesh Akbari defeated her challenger and will face Republican Sam Watkins in the General.

92

Representative Billy Spivey was unopposed and will face Democrat Vicki Cain in the General.

93

Representative G.A. Hardaway was unopposed and will face Republican Colonel Gene Billingsley in the General.

94

Leigh Rosser Wilburn won a three-way Republican race to replace retiring Representative Barrett Rich.  She has no opponent in the General.

95

Representative Curry Todd was unopposed and has no General opponent.

96

Representative Steve McManus was unopposed and will face Democrat Dwayne Thompson in the General.

97

Representative Jim Coley was unopposed and has no General opponent.

98

Representative Antonio Parkinson was unopposed and has no General opponent.

99

Representative Ron Lollar was unopposed and has no General opponent.

 

Pledge to vote this election season

Election season is officially upon us:  Early voting for the state and federal primaries and county general election begins today and will continue until Saturday, August 2.

Voter turnout in state primary elections is typically much lower than in general elections.  Take 2012 for example.  Voter turnout for the primary reached just 18.6 percent.  In contrast, voter turnout for the general election reached 62 percent.

We think voting is so important that we are asking our advocates to join us in Pledging To Vote this election season.  We believe this is an important way to build awareness about one of our key responsibilities as American citizens.

Fill out my online form.
Online contact and registration forms from Wufoo.

Get Registered: Primary Election Voter Registration Deadline Today

We hope that UT Advocates will exercise their right to vote in the upcoming August 7 primary.  If you are not registered to vote, today marks an important deadline.  It is the deadline to register to vote in the August primary election.

Recent Tennessee primary election results only amplify the importance of your vote.  Some 2012 primary races were determined by 15, 11, even 5 votes.  Make sure your voice is heard at the ballot box by taking the time to register.  It only takes a moment.  Simply fill out this mail-in application for voter registration and mail it to your county election commission.  A voter registration card will be mailed to the address you’ve provided.  This card will tell you where to vote.

Mark your calendars now: Early voting begins on July 18 and runs until August 2.  Primary Election Day is August 7.

DiPietro Takes Stand for Education, Tells Trustees a Plan Is Under Development

Education is critical to the future prosperity of Tennessee and should be a higher priority for the state. University of Tennessee System President Joe DiPietro told the Board of Trustees yesterday he is committed to reversing the current trend of dwindling state appropriations for higher education.

The board also honored UT President Emeritus Joseph E. Johnson with the Trustees’ Lifetime Achievement Award, the highest honor bestowed by the board. Johnson has worked continuously for the University since 1963, serving in several executive positions including UT president from 1990 to 1999. He is credited with devising the structure of the UT System and raising fundraising levels and support.

Trustees approved a $2.05 billion budget for fiscal year 2015, reflecting relatively flat state funding for higher education. The budget includes a 6 percent tuition increase for most undergraduate and graduate students and contains no salary increases for faculty and staff for the first time since FY11.

In 2001, tuition and fees made up 25 percent of unrestricted educational and general revenues for the University while state appropriations were 53 percent. In 2011, the lines crossed, with tuition and fees making up 47 percent and state appropriations 38 percent. That trend continues today with tuition and fees at 49 percent and appropriations at 39 percent.

E&G Funding Graph

In 2001, state funding made up 53% of UT’s unrestricted educational and general revenues. Today, state funding makes up only 39%, while tuition and fees make up 49%.

“We have to develop a plan and build a coalition,” DiPietro said. “We need for Tennessee to make investments in education. It’s not just what is right for us. It’s right for all Tennessee. It’s right for our children’s children as we go forward.”

UT’s undergraduate campuses in Chattanooga, Knoxville and Martin received modest increases based on the outcomes-based funding formula set forth in the Complete College Tennessee Act (CCTA). The CCTA funding formula is based on several metrics related to graduate and undergraduate graduation rates, undergraduate student progression and research expenditures. The performance outcomes by UT campuses resulted in a recommendation of $14 million in new funding, but the state appropriated only $5.7 million to the University. The state budget also provided no capital outlay, funding for non-formula units or funding for increased advising services.

DiPietro noted the governor’s Drive to 55 to increase the percentage of Tennesseans with some type of degree to 55 by 2025 and the Tennessee Promise, which will provide free tuition for students to state community colleges, are good steps.

“It’s now time to put the last piece in place,” DiPietro said. “I’m committed to trying to resolve this problem. I think it’s time for us, with your help, to make a stand, a stand about higher education, a stand about education in the state and a stand about reversing the trend.”

The University had hoped to keep tuition increases to 3 percent if the state could fully fund CCTA performance and provide other requested funding.

“After learning the amount of state support, we asked the chancellors to determine the revenue needs on each campus. Tuition helps fund operating costs, utilities, inflationary costs, scholarships and fellowships, additional faculty positions, academic program and research projects,” DiPietro said.

Tuition increases approved for all campuses effective this fall:

  • UT Chattanooga – 6 percent increase, or $365 a year more, for in-state undergraduates ($6,430 a year total) and $436 a year more for in-state graduate students ($7,708 a  year total)
  • UT Knoxville students admitted before fall 2013 – 6 percent increase, or $496 a year more, for in-state undergraduates ($8,766 a year total) and $572 a year more for in-state graduate students ($10,112 a year total).
  • UT Knoxville students admitted in fall 2013 under the 15-4 tuition model – 3 percent increase, or $294 a year more, for in-state undergraduates ($10,074 a year total) and $390 a year more for in-state graduate students ($11,584 a year total). The new 15-4 model charges new full-time undergraduates for 15 credit hours instead of 12 credit hours to encourage four-year graduation.
  • UT Knoxville students admitted in fall 2014 under the 15-4 tuition model – $10,366 a year for in-state undergraduates and $11,876 a year for in-state graduate students.
  • UT Martin – 6 percent increase, or $380 a year more, for in-state undergraduates ($6,716 a year total) and $454 a year more for in-state graduate students ($8,014 a year total)
  • UT Health Science Center – no tuition increases
  • UT Veterinary Medicine – 5 percent increase or $1,132 a year more for in-state students and out-of-state students

In response to Senate Resolution 626 considered this spring by the General Assembly following debate over the student-organized Sex Week event at UT Knoxville, DiPietro enlisted the help of campus leaders to develop recommendations for a System-wide policy on student activities fees.

The board approved the Policy on a Student Programs and Services Fee, which directs campuses to develop an opt-in procedure before the fall semester that allows students to expressly authorize payment toward student programs funded by the Student Programs and Services Fee (SPSF). The opt-in procedure applies only to UT Chattanooga and UT Knoxville. UT Health Science Center and UT Martin do not allocate any part of the fee to student-organized programming.

The policy also directs the campuses to include a statement with the opt-in procedure that student-organized programming may be controversial or objectionable to students and that a list will be provided of all student-organized programming funded by the SPSF during the previous academic year. The policy addresses the membership of the Student Programming Allocation Board, which allocates the SPSF for student-organized programming. It says the board must have a majority of non-student employees of the University with at least 40 percent of members being students.

The Diversity Advisory Council, comprised of representatives across the UT System, developed a diversity statement that was approved by the board. In part, the statement reads: “The Board affirms the educational value of a diverse and fully inclusive campus community, one that is enriched by persons of different backgrounds, points of view, cultures, socioeconomic status, and other diverse characteristics. The Board expects the University to engage in a variety of initiatives to advance diversity in all aspects of University life.”

The board approved performance goals and a retention amount for UTC Chancellor Steve Angle, who is eligible to participate in the Performance and Retention Plan for executive officers of UT after serving as chancellor for one year as of July 1, 2014. Angle’s plan covers July 1 through June 30, 2017. The maximum retention amount he can receive is $130,950, which is 15 percent of his 2014 base salary multiplied by three years in the plan. DiPietro recommended goals for Angle such as increasing the six-year freshman graduation rate from 37 percent to 47 percent and increase the number of alumni who donate to the University from 2,601 to 2,759.

UTHSC Chancellor Steve Schwab underwent a comprehensive performance review that is conducted for chancellors after four years in office and at subsequent four-year intervals. Schwab has been chancellor since 2010. DiPietro noted in Schwab’s review that UTHSC has stabilized the educational enterprise and grown the clinical functions, and he noted Schwab is committed to increasing total research expenditures, number of research proposals, research award dollars and number of research awards.

In February, the board approved two new policies on the use of University property that replace policies that had been in place for more than 40 years. Under the Tennessee Uniform Administrative Procedure Act, the rules were sent to the Tennessee Attorney General, who asked for some clarification of the rules. The board approved new language as part of the rules.

The “Use of University Property” rule states that students, employees, members of the Board of Trustees, government officials, contract workers, volunteers, prospective students, alumni and people invited by a student, student organization or employee are authorized users of University property.

The new “Use of University Property by Non-Affiliated Persons for Free Expression Activities” rule states that University property is not open for free expression activities for persons who are not students, employees or volunteers. There are exceptions to this rule, including a person invited by a student organization to join in the student organization’s speech, a person invited by a faculty member to join in the faculty member’s speech and a person invited by a University unit. The rule also states University and city streets and sidewalks parallel to those streets are open to speech by any person.

The board opened the meeting by presenting an honorary resolution for outgoing trustee Shalin Shah, the student representative from UT Chattanooga. Non-voting members R.J. Duncan, the student representative, and David Golden, the faculty representative, from UT Knoxville joined the board.

The board was informed of the University’s plans for the house and property in Knoxville bequeathed to UT by Eugenia Williams, who passed away in 1998. DiPietro accepted an advisory committee’s recommendation that the University issue an RFP to lease the property for a term of 99 or 50 years. The successful bidder would be required to restore the house and maintain other structures and property according to University specifications. The bidder also could occupy the house, make additions and improvements that meet historic restoration standards or construct a single family house on the property.

In other action, the board approved:

  • UTHSC’s regional tuition rate program for the College of Pharmacy in Memphis for a three-year trial period. Eligible students in Mississippi and Arkansas in a 50-mile radius of Memphis could receive a 75 percent discount on out-of-state tuition, beginning in fall 2014.
  • Extension of UTC’s regional tuition rate program for undergraduates and graduate students. The program is offered to students in seven counties of north Georgia and Alabama. Eligible students receive a 75 percent discount on out-of-state tuition. The undergraduate program has been in place since 2007, and the graduate program in place since 2010.
  • UT Knoxville Faculty Handbook revisions regarding faculty rights and responsibilities of shared governance.
  • Naming of the UT Knoxville volleyball practice facility the Joan Cronan Volleyball Practice facility in honor of Cronan, the director of women’s athletics retiring this summer.
  • Naming of the Chi Omega sorority house at UT Martin for Pat Summitt, Lady Vols coach emeritus and UT Martin aluma.
  • Revision of Academic Affairs and Student Success Committee charter
  • Tenure recommendations from all campuses.

The meeting’s full agenda and materials are posted at http://bot.tennessee.edu/.

An archive of the webcast meeting is available at http://www.tennessee.edu/.